How to perform BGP traffic engineering using Quagga on Linux

The previous tutorials demonstrated how we can turn a CentOS box into a BGP router and filter BGP prefixes using Quagga. Now that we understand basic BGP configuration, we will examine in this tutorial how to perform more advanced traffic engineering on Quagga. More specifically, we will show how we can influence the routing path […]
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How to set up IPv6 BGP peering and filtering in Quagga BGP router

In the previous tutorials, we demonstrated how we can set up a full-fledged BGP router and configure prefix filtering with Quagga. In this tutorial, we are going to show you how we can set up IPv6 BGP peering and advertise IPv6 prefixes through BGP. We will also demonstrate how we can filter IPv6 prefixes advertised […]
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How to filter BGP routes in Quagga BGP router

In the previous tutorial, we demonstrated how to turn a CentOS box into a BGP router using Quagga. We also covered basic BGP peering and prefix exchange setup. In this tutorial, we will focus on how we can control incoming and outgoing BGP prefixes by using prefix-list and route-map. As described in earlier tutorials, BGP […]
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How to turn your CentOS box into a BGP router using Quagga

In a previous tutorial, I described how we can easily turn a Linux box into a fully-fledged OPSF router using Quagga, an open source routing software suite. In this tutorial, I will focus on converting a Linux box into a BGP router, again using Quagga, and demonstrate how to set up BGP peering with other […]
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How to turn your CentOS box into an OSPF router using Quagga

Quagga is an open source routing software suite that can be used to turn your Linux box into a fully-fledged router that supports major routing protocols like RIP, OSPF, BGP or ISIS router. It has full provisions for IPv4 and IPv6, and supports route/prefix filtering. Quagga can be a life saver in case your production […]
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How to use logrotate to manage log files in Linux

Log files contain useful information about what is going on within the system. They are often inspected during troubleshooting processes or server performance analysis. For a busy server, log files may grow quickly into very large sizes. This becomes a problem as the server will soon run out of space. Besides, working with a single […]
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How to monitor server memory usage with Nagios Remote Plugin Executor (NRPE)

In a previous tutorial, we have seen how we can set up Nagios Remote Plugin Executor (NRPE) in an existing Nagios setup. However, the scripts and plugins needed to monitor memory usage do not come with stock Nagios. In this tutorial, we will see how we can configure NRPE to monitor RAM usage of a […]
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How to create a site-to-site IPsec VPN tunnel using Openswan in Linux

A virtual private network (VPN) tunnel is used to securely interconnect two physically separate networks through a tunnel over the Internet. Tunneling is needed when the separate networks are private LAN subnets with globally non-routable private IP addresses, which are not reachable to each other via traditional routing over the Internet. For example, VPN tunnels […]
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What are useful CLI tools for Linux system admins

System administrators (sysadmins) are responsible for day-to-day operations of production systems and services. One of the critical roles of sysadmins is to ensure that operational services are available round the clock. For that, they have to carefully plan backup policies, disaster management strategies, scheduled maintenance, security audits, etc. Like every other discipline, sysadmins have their […]
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How to analyze Squid logs with SARG log analyzer on CentOS

In a previous tutorial, we show how to configure a transparent proxy with Squid on CentOS. Squid provides many useful features, but analyzing a raw Squid log file is not straightfoward. For example, how could you analyze the time stamps and the number of hits in the following Squid log? 1404788984.429 1162 172.17.1.23 TCP_MISS/302 436 […]
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