How to set up a primary DNS server using CentOS

Any operational domain has at least two DNS servers, one being called a primary name server (ns1), and the other a secondary name server (ns2). These servers are typically operated for DNS failover: If one server goes down, the other server becomes an active DNS server. More sophisticated failover mechanisms involving load balancers, firewalls and […]
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How to set up a transparent HTTPS filtering proxy on CentOS

HTTPS protocol is used more and more in today’s web. While this may be good for privacy, it leaves modern network administrator without any means to prevent questionable or adult contents from entering his/her network. Previously it was assumed that this problem does not have a decent solution. Our how-to guide will try to prove […]
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How to set up MailScanner, Clam Antivirus and SpamAssassin in CentOS mail server

In the world of mail servers, MailScanner is one of the best open source software for virus scanning and spam detection. MailScanner relies on pre-installed anti-virus and anti-spam software to check incoming and outgoing emails for malicious content or patterns of spamming. This makes sure that the mail server does not participate in the distribution […]
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How to configure SNMPv3 in Ubuntu, CentOS and Cisco

Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) is a widely used protocol for gathering information about what is going on within a device. For example, CPU and RAM usage, load on a server, traffic status in a network interface, and many other interesting properties of a device can be queried using SNMP. Currently, three versions of SNMP […]
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How to install and configure KVM on CentOS

KVM is a kernel-based hypervisor which grows quickly in maturity and popularity in the Linux server market. Red Hat officially dropped Xen in favor of KVM since RHEL 6. With KVM being officially supported by Red Hat, installing KVM on RedHat-based systems should be a breeze. In this tutorial, I will describe how to install […]
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How to set up a Subversion (SVN) server on CentOS or Fedora

The open-source community has been using Subversion (or SVN) widely for many collaborative open-source development projects. SVN is supported by all major open-source project hosting sites such as Google Code, GitHub, SourceForge and Launchpad. You can of course set up your own Subversion server in house. SVN supports several protocols for network access: SVN, SVN+SSH, […]
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