What are better alternatives to basic command line utilities

The command line can be scary especially at the beginning. You might even experience some command-line-induced nightmare. Over time, however, we all realize that the command line is actually not that scary, but extremely useful. In fact, the lack of shell is what gives me an ulcer every time I have to use Windows. The […]
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How to access Linux command cheat sheets from the command line

The power of Linux command line is its flexibility and versatility. Each Linux command comes with its share of command line options and parameters. Mix and match them, and even chain different commands with pipes and redirects. You get yourself literally hundreds of use cases even with a few basic commands, and it’s hard even […]
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How to use awk command in Linux

Text processing is at the heart of Unix. From pipes to the /proc subsystem, the “everything is a file” philosophy pervades the operating system and all of the tools built for it. Because of this, getting comfortable with text-processing is one of the most important skills for an aspiring Linux system administrator, or even any […]
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How to speed up directory navigation in a Linux terminal

As useful as navigating through directories from the command line is, rarely anything has become as frustrating as repeating over and over “cd ls cd ls cd ls …” If you are not a hundred percent sure of the name of the directory you want to go to next, you have to use ls. Then […]
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How to diff and merge files or directories on Linux

There are many cases where you want to compare and/or merge two files or directories. For example, you may want to compare two distinct backup snapshots; merge two different versions of a document; diff two configuration files for troubleshooting, etc. While version control systems can handle this kind of situations easily, it is probably an […]
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What is a good HEX editor on Linux

A hex editor is different from a regular text editor in that the former displays the raw binary content of a given file, without applying any text encoding or typesetting. A hex editor can be useful in various cases, e.g., repairing disk image and partition, reverse-engineering binary code, patching emulator ROM files, analyzing malware, etc. […]
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